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Shaggy's US$1-Million Charity Concert

PLATINUM recording artiste Shaggy is aiming to donate US$1,000,000 in kind to Bustamante Hospital for Children in Kingston, when he hosts the sixth staging of his Shaggy and Friends concert on the lawns of Jamaica House, later this week.

Shaggy, whose given name is Orville Burrell, told yesterday's Jamaica Observer Monday Exchange that he is hoping to make a significant reach in the Diaspora and the international community.

“If I could raise a million US (United States dollars) it would be great. Our biggest year was with Tessanne [Chin] and we made somewhere [around] US$800,000. This year the ticket prices are up, so hopefully we can get to the million. But whether we make $500,000 or $300,000, we're still going to do our thing as we have in the past, but it would be nice to reach that,” he told editors and reporters at the newspaper's Beechwood Avenue offices in St Andrew.

“…I think a lot of it comes down to organisation and trust. A lot of people in the Diaspora want to give, but it's not organised enough and there's not a lot of trust. You have to remember that there's the stigma that Jamaica is allegedly the scamming capital of the world. So, a lot of people are afraid to send and that's why we're not getting a big part of the Diaspora. But I'm urging them to get involved,” he added.

The event, which focuses on the health of children and health care resources with its tag line of '1 ticket = 1 life', is scheduled for January 6. Showtime is 8:00 pm.

Yesterday, the entertainer disclosed that the hospital's needs list presented over previous years to the team has already been met, but added that there will always be needs, pointing to this year's list.

“Every year we target a particular thing. For the last couple of concerts we've pretty much put our money towards the cardiac wing of the hospital. We still have the cath lab to be done. Our job at Shaggy and Friends is to furnish that lab... And then we will be able to do cardiac surgeries here in Jamaica,” Burrell said, noting that the machines for the lab are on hold, pending the completion of the lab.

A cath lab or catheterisation laboratory is an examination room in a hospital or clinic with diagnostic imaging equipment used to visualise the arteries of the heart and the chambers of the heart and treat any stenosis or abnormality found.

The Shaggy Make A Difference Foundation has so far donated 300 pieces of equipment to the hospital, but shares that there are concerns regarding the Intensive Care Unit (ICU).

“There are only five beds in the ICU for the entire Jamaica. We would love to get 15, but right now if we get 10 that would be great. The building itself, if you look at the ICU, we can't hold anything else in there. So we have to expand the building and that is where the challenge is going to be,” the performing artiste explained, adding that the hospital's inability to accommodate patients is troubling.

“Most hospitals take 50 to 60 patients per day; Bustamante [Hospital for Children is] brushing 200 on a daily basis. Parents are travelling with their sick kids from as far as Negril and from Lucea. I met a woman from Lucea and she was at the hospital with her sick child for four days without showering. There are no facilities for parents — we need to figure that out,” he added.

At the same time, Shaggy appealed for “more land” to facilitate the expansion of the Caribbean's only children's hospital of that kind.

“We're on JDF's (Jamaica Defence Force's) land and right now mi a beg the general fi piece more, because we need another ward. So all of these are things that we have to continue to focus on and fight to see if we can make things happen at our health care facility. If them can give a quarter acre or acre, we alright,” he shared.

“We can do a lot with that.”

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British Reggae Legend Receives Honorary Fellowship

Dennis Bovell was among prominent figures, from the realms of entertainment, journalism, art, and technology, to be honoured by Goldsmiths, University of London.
ICONIC ARTIST and record producer Dennis Bovell received an honorary fellowship from Goldsmiths, University of London for his influence in music and culture, last Wednesday (20 December).
In his acceptance speech, Mr. Bovell offered a brief recollection of his personal and professional journey to date:
"I was invited to this part of London 40 years ago to become a sound engineer at a studio (...). The aim of that studio was to provide London with music that would sign record books that we had made that in London. It was not something that was coming from abroad but something we created here.
"My grandparents would be very proud of this moment because they were both musicians and it was me, tagging along with my grandad to choir practice, watching him assemble the hallelujah chorus, that kind of made me think 'hmm...I could give this a go.'"
Dennis Bovell was born in Saint Peter, Barbados, and moved to south London at the age of 12. He is widely recognised as the innovator of British Lover's Rock and is the producer of big hits such as 'Silly Games' by Janet Kay and 'After Tonight' with his band Matumbi. He is also a singer, multi instrumentalist and sound engineer known for his unique dubs and creative style.

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Lioneyes to Headline Reggae Concert in Kigali

Reggae music lovers are in for a treat, with a three-in-one reggae concert dubbed 'Roots Reggae At The Control.'
The concerts are organized by reggae musician Lioneyes Jasporah from the One Cell Foundation, a roots reggae band based in Brussels, Belgium. The band was formed in 2014.
The concerts kick off today, Thursday December 28th, at the Inema Art Center in Kacyiru. The show is a highly billed year-ender for Inema's Thursday Happy Hour, a popular weekly musical jam session that has become a prominent fixture on Kigali's nightlife circuit.
After the Inema Concert, the party will head to Rebero hill, at Alpha and Omega on January 1 2018. On January 6, the last show will be staged at the Mulindi Japan One Love Project in Kimihurura.
The concerts will also be spiced up with other local reggae acts like 2T Reggae Man, Holy Jah Doves, Lion Imanzi, and the Strong Voice Band. On the DJ decks will be DJ Reggae Zone.
Lioneyes Jasporah, the main act has been living in Brussels, Belgium where he relocated from Rwanda in 1994. In 2003, he made a rare homecoming, that time to design the Kigali Genocide Memorial in Gisozi.
His music focuses on universal themes like feelings, color, identity, love, and unity.
At the concerts, he will unveil the songs off the band's latest album, Space and Memory, of which Lioeyes says. "There is no time without memory, because memory creates time."

 

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‘Legacy’ By Reggae Fraternity UK

Guests were dazzled with a star-studded evening, in which some of the country’s most talented reggae artists were showcased and celebrated.
REGGAE FRATERNITY UK (RFUK) produced a riveting event in honour of British reggae musical heritage last month, with a night of good music and celebration.
Aptly called ‘Legacy’, it showcased the best of Britain’s reggae talent…and some of their children too! With its unique concept and refreshing edge, ‘Legacy’ was one of the best concerts of 2017.
Some of the hottest, emergent artists shone at ‘The Grand’ in Clapham, south London – such as Subajah, Carolene Thompson, Kya Shykwain, Lyn Gerald, Lioness Fonts, Dennis Pinnock, Darien Prophecy, Sparky Rugged, Randy Valentine and Nairobi Thompson.
The British reggae scene has a history of being largely dominated by female artists. It was encouraging to see a number of men billed on the event’s line-up.
GIFTED
Sese Foster, a singer who rose to prominence on X Factor as part of the girl group Miss Dynamix in 2013, left a lasting impression on the audience.
Exemplifying a perfect marriage between old classics and new ones, she warbled an acoustic version of cultural anthem ‘Black Pride’ by Kofi, before launching into her own, self-penned ode to the motherland ‘Africa’.
Sese received an ovation from the audience and many calls to sing it again; round here, we call it a ‘forward’ - a coveted feat for any performer. Co-host Curtis Walker came out to publicly endorse this young woman’s talent. Referring to the Muller Rice Five Grains advert and the furore it raised surrounding the perceived appropriation of black culture, Walker said:
"We are celebrating reggae music tonight. We see it bastardised on the telly with their Muller Rice & bears and suchlike."
ENGAGING
On the topic of hosts, comedic giants Donna Spence and Curtis Walker did a fantastic job of keeping the audience entertained in between acts. They served us with impromptu skits, easy skanking, jokes aplenty and warm, relatable anecdotes.
For instance, early into the night, Donna spoke of how reggae music helped to entertain her while completing household chores as a youngster, growing up.
She said; “Reggae music helped me clean the skirting boards.”
Immediately I burst out laughing, thinking of the 11-year-old me, stooped down next to a white bucket, wiping the skirting boards, further to my mother’s strict instruction. This would always take place against a backdrop of some serious reggae tunes, courtesy of Vibes FM, Galaxy Radio or vinyl records. That's how I came to learn many of the songs, word for word.
Judging by the reaction to Donna’s comment, many other audience members could relate too!
HEIR APPARENTS
Marla Brown, daughter of the Crown Prince of reggae Dennis Brown, did not disappoint. Literally bursting onto the stage, rocking to her backing melodies with infectious swagger, she sung original tracks including ‘Here Comes the King’.
Jo Caesar, Levi Roots’ daughter and winner of Reggae Star Factor (2015), effortlessly treated the audience to ‘Coming On Strong’ and ‘Different Kind of Love’.
He also apologised for not being able to attend the event due to touring commitments. This was played ahead of his older brother Dwayne’s joint performance with their mother Donna Michael.
By the way - in case you missed the news - acclaimed rock steady singer Delroy Wilson is Dwayne and Konan’s father! This came as a complete revelation to many in the audience. In a stirring tribute, Donna and Dwayne sung ‘Rain From The Sky’ - song popularised by the late Wilson.
Not only is Winsome (Burrell) a gifted vocalist – she always demonstrates comedic prowess too. In the lead up to her duet with daughter Monique, she had the audience smiling away at her jokes and expressions.
Lorna ‘Sutara’ Gee and her son, R&B crooner, Starboy Nathan, together sung Gee’s 1985 smash hit ‘Gotta Find A Way’. It was revealed that she wrote this song a year before Nathan was born!
Stalwarts Sylvia Tella, Dennis Bovell and Kofi gave energetic performances of some of classics that they’re known and loved for, all over the world. Backing vocals were provided by True Identity (Joanne Cotterell, Rowena Cotterell and Pamela Francis) and music by the RFUK Premier band.
Towards the end of the night, DJ/radio personality PD Coolie handed over an award to the iconic Tony Williams for his contribution to reggae music. Rising star Cassandra London presented lovers rock queen Janet Kay with an award in recognition of her 40 years in the music industry. Both expressed humble thanks for their accolades.
MISSION
Run by artists, for artists; Reggae Fraternity UK (RFUK) is a voluntary organisation aimed at supporting reggae artists and musicians in the UK.
An official press release explained more about the event’s concept:
“The aim is to facilitate and showcase the reggae talent in the UK and to ensure that the genre lives on. From Lovers Rock to Dancehall, we have done it all.
“UK acts have been monumental in the development of the reggae scene worldwide, and it is time to ‘pass on the baton’ and shine the light in our own back garden.”
After the successful staging of ‘Legacy’, RFUK founder, Lorna ‘Sutara’ Gee, told The Voice:
"The whole purpose of the event was to highlight our great reggae legacy in the UK. We have such a rich diversity of talent right here in Britain that needs nurturing. RFUK wants to be a part of that process. I think we proved that we’re capable of passing on that baton."

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David Rodigan Reflects on His Life In Reggae

Wearing a custom made diamond-patterned three-piece suit, oversized black rimmed glasses and speaking in an authoritative British accent, 66-year-old David Rodigan MBE is, to say the least, an anomaly in the gritty, competitive world of reggae sound system clashes. The art of the sound clash, where sound system selectors (DJs) use reggae hits and/or altered versions of popular songs (called dub plates or specials) to defeat rival sounds, predates Jamaica’s recording industry -- in fact, the need for exclusive music to ensure triumph was a catalyst in the industry's development.
For the introductory round on the third annual sound clash aboard Damian Marley’s Welcome to Jamrock Reggae Cruise, which sailed from Florida to Jamaica on Royal Caribbean’s Independence of the Seas in Nov. 2017, Rodigan didn’t reach into his collection of exclusive specials by Jamaican icons including Prince Buster, Tenor Saw or Super Cat; instead he chose The Anvil Chorus from Giuseppe Verde’s 1853 opera Il Trovatore. Portraying an orchestral conductor, Rodigan earned a rousing response from the audience of approximately 1,800. “I am older than anyone on this stage,” Rodigan told the crowd, referencing his rivals (Canada’s King Turbo, Jamaica’s Tony Matterhorn and reigning Jamrock Cruise Clash champs, Japan’s Mighty Crown). “But there’s a saying in Jamaica that the older the moon, the brighter it shines.” Rodigan then dropped a version Cocoa Tea’s “18 and Over,” with the singer’s warning to an underage girl to go home to her mother serving as a threat to the younger selectors; the rambunctious crowd roared their approval, many waving British flags amidst the blaring horns and whistles.
Rodigan followed that with a salute to Harry Belafonte -- “the first recording artist to sell 1 million albums. The year was 1956, the album was Calypso and the song ‘Jamaica Farewell’ is appropriate because today the Jamrock cruise set sail from Jamaica.” The audience cheered, sang along and Rodigan reveled in the presentation, which ran almost two minutes -- nearly four times as long as the typical dub plate or song snippet played in a clashing round.
Rodigan didn’t win the Jamrock sound clash; in fact, he was the first to be eliminated, but 40 years into his extraordinary career as a radio broadcaster (currently heard on BBC 1Xtra), club DJ, and sound clash luminary, victories aren’t as important as his longstanding contributions to the clashing art form. Rodigan’s comprehensive introductions to each record, unique selections, prerecorded comedic skits (including a fake news bulletin announcing the demise of his Jamrock rivals in the upcoming film Murder on the High Seas) and refusal to curse at or insult his clashing opponents (a courtesy that isn’t always reciprocated) has earned him a highly respected status in the reggae arena and the affectionate moniker Gentleman Rudeboy.
“When you sign up for a repertory company as a young actor there is a saying ‘play as cast’ and last night I was playing as cast, a character cameo, doing what I do, as I do it,” Rodigan -- a trained actor who has appeared on numerous British TV shows -- told Billboard the day following the Jamrock clash. “Clearly Mighty Crown (who secured their third consecutive Jamrock victory) played the starring role; they are an incredibly inventive four man team, they’ve got customized dubs I couldn’t possibly match and I admire them because they are quite unique in their interpretation of clash culture as non-Jamaicans.”
Likewise, David Rodigan has put his distinctive, indelible stamp on the reggae landscape, as he documents in his autobiography Rodigan: My Life In Reggae, co-written with British journalist Ian Burrell. Originally published in the UK (Constable) in March 2017, with a paperback edition due in early 2018, Rodigan’s book is a briskly paced recollection of his journey from aspiring actor to one of reggae’s most famous DJs. The recipient of countless awards throughout the decades, in 2012 Rodigan was bestowed by Prince Charles the prestigious Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (MBE), the UK's fifth highest award, for services in broadcasting.
“David Rodigan is someone you hear about in Jamaica from the time you are a kid, he had the legendary clashes in the 1980s with (veteran broadcaster) Barry G (Barry Gordon, on Jamaica’s JBC radio) and he’s very knowledgeable about our music’s history, something that I always enjoy speaking to him about,” comments Damian “Junior Gong” Marley, who founded and produces the Welcome to Jamrock Reggae Cruise (named after his Grammy-winning Welcome to Jamrock album) with his manager Dan Dalton. Complementing the cruise’s five nights of reggae concerts by top tier acts, Damian introduced sound clashing to the schedule in 2015 and it’s evolved into arguably Jamrock’s most anticipated event. “David’s name carries weight in the sound system arena, he is entertaining and he brought a balance to Mighty Crown who are a fascinating story, coming from Japan, embracing reggae and speaking with Jamaican accents,” Damian continued. “David has a similar story, as a white gentleman from England engulfed in Jamaican culture.”
“People have heard about Rodigan or watched him on YouTube clips but not everybody onboard has seen him before so we were fortunate to have him with us this year,” adds Dan Dalton. “Forty-two countries converged on the cruise, all for their love of reggae and Rodigan is a great representative of the different cultures that have connective relationships to the music. He presents records in a way that I don’t see many selectors doing; he gives importance to the music.”
David “Ram Jam” Rodigan was born on June 24, 1951, on a military base in Hanover, Germany to Scotch-Irish parents and raised in the North African nation of Libya; when he was eight, the family relocated to Oxfordshire in southeast England. Rodigan’s fascination with Jamaican music began a few years later when he heard teenaged Jamaican singer Millie Small’s ska hit “My Boy Lollipop”, which went to No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1964, the first major hit for Chris Blackwell's Island Records (via the Fontana imprint). He was given the nickname “Ram Jam” for his love of the rock steady instrumental by the late Jamaican keyboardist Jackie Mittoo.
As he pursued his acting career, Rodigan retained his passion for reggae, collecting records, working at reggae record shops and attending sound system dances. Rodigan’s obsession prompted his girlfriend to write a letter to the BBC on his behalf in 1978, which resulted in an audition for the job of presenter on BBC Radio London’s Sunday afternoon reggae program. He was eventually hired, first co-hosting with three others then alternating duties with Tony Williams. Rodigan moved to Capital Radio in September 1979, hosting the popular Saturday night Roots Rockers show for 11 years, which brought him even further accolades. In 1990 he moved to Kiss FM, a dance music station where he spent 22 years presenting various programs including Rodigan's Reggae; he resigned in 2012 due to the increasing marginalization of his reggae program within the station’s schedule.
“Rodigan has been a part of my life since I was a teenager, I would tape all of his shows and then buy the records he played,” reminisces Layde English, a New York based syndicated broadcaster and booking agent for veteran Jamaican singer Johnny Osbourne, born in London to Jamaican parents. “Rodigan’s appeal was that he did his research and you could feel his genuine love for the music. UK sound systems came before him but they played reggae underground, Rodigan’s platforms took the music over ground and without him reggae never would have become so popular in England among so many different ethnicities.”
Despite his immense popularity and his uncompromising efforts in promoting Jamaican music, Rodigan has had his detractors. He writes about “being the subject of spite in pamphlets and online radio broadcasts,” including a flyer from The Black Music Protection Squad which depicted Rodigan with a noose around his neck accompanied by the words “wanted for the rape of Black music.” Death threats followed and the police were called; Rodigan’s Black listenership was outraged. Further contentions have arisen with the success of his My Life In Reggae book. Jamaica born, England based veteran Lloydie Coxsone, founder of Sir Coxsone Outernational Sound System, posted a tirade on YouTube calling Rodigan “David Rob ‘n Gone” and an “exploiter of the music.” “When me see dem big up white boy like David Rodigan over Jamaicans who go through a whole heap of hardships to buss Jamaican music in this country, these things are very hurtful,” Coxsone said.
The furor stemmed from a promotional interview on a national news show in England, where the presenter referred to Rodigan as the godfather of reggae, a title Rodigan did not refute. “I was embarrassed but it was live TV, what was I going to do, stop the presenter and ask her to say it again?” Rodigan told Billboard. Rodigan, who has done numerous radio specials lauding Coxsone and other UK sound system pioneers, initially remained silent, then responded to Coxsone’s video with a few sentences on social media; otherwise, he has never commented on the episode until this interview, which, he avows, will be the last time. “I was horrified, deeply upset, offended, it’s racist, vitriolic, bitter, and resentful; I couldn’t believe what I heard; it was like a horror movie. I wondered why is he saying these lies? I decided not to respond for some considerable time because what do you say to something like that, if people don’t know after 40 years what I have done? Then it became apparent that I needed to make a statement so I asked him to prove the lies he had told. I am still waiting for the proof of his unfounded accusations.”
Garfield “Chin” Bourne, one half of Irish and Chin, promoters of sound system events since 1997 including The World Clash (won by Rodigan in 2012) and managers of Mighty Crown, has worked extensively with Rodigan; at Rodigan’s request, he moderated Rodigan’s Q&A/book signing session on the Jamrock cruise. “No one had a right to attack David the way Coxsone did but he felt David should have said ‘I am not the godfather, others came way before me.’ Should David have done that? However you view that situation, it doesn’t take away from David’s contributions. I am not saying being white hasn’t helped David but as easily as you recognize he’s a white man, it’s just as easy to recognize that he’s extremely talented and is always well prepared,” says Chin, who was born in the U.S. to Jamaican parents. “David has done something no one has, even the legendary Jamaican radio presenter Barry Gordon can’t do what David does in the dancehall space and Mighty Crown, Stone Love and other big names in dancehall can’t do what David does on radio.”
David Rodigan will celebrate his 40th anniversary as a broadcaster in 2018 with a special event: Rodigan meets the Outlook Orchestra to be held on March 2, Royal Festival Hall at London’s Southbank Centre. The event sold out in less than two hours, the demand for tickets crashing the venue’s website. The 25-piece Outlook Orchestra, led by Tommy Evans, will perform symphonic arrangements of Jamaican standards featuring several unannounced guest artists. Rodigan will introduce songs and tell stories related to the music, something he has excelled at for 40 years -- in sound clashes, on the radio and now in the pages of his autobiography. “Tommy Evans is doing the arrangements for ska, rocksteady, reggae and dancehall classics, and drum and bass, so the program will sweep the last 50 years,” Rodigan shares. “The Royal Festival Hall wants to do a second night but my feeling is we sold out one night let’s just leave it at that. I am over the moon about it; I may have to wear that (black and white) suit again.”

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Archbishop Palmer-Buckle Performs ‘Redemption Song’

Those that robe have affinity with pulpit. The pulpit can be described as the clergy’s launch pad. Good News to the flock has often come from the pulpit. From time immemorial the pulpit has been used to preach, to teach, to beseech, to deceive, to praise, to condemn, to rob, to bully and to persecute the faithfuls or congregants.
However some clergies have delivered the homily without using the pulpit. Some God’s servants have demonstrated that the sermon can come from outside the Church or Synagogue walls. They’ve proven that the word can be heard, shared and transported anywhere and everywhere, if the preacher so chooses.
Over the weekend a clergyman in Ghana, Metropolitan Archbishop of Accra Charles Gabriel Palmer -Buckle used Reggae-- a music genre to convey a message to his audience but also called on all Ghanaians and faithfuls across the world (re-echoing Marley’s sensational song) to liberate themselves from mental slavery.
I’m pretty sure you’re familiar with this line from ‘Redemption Song’: Old pirates, yes they rob I.
Old pirates are known for robbery and pillaging. And you think the bandits have stopped robbing us?
No, piracy still goes on. And that could explain why Rev. Palmer-Buckle did something that seem unorthodox or unusual. Bishop Buckle buckled down as he performed a wonderful rendition of ‘Redemption Song’ by Bob Marley and the Wailers last Saturday December 23, 2017 in Accra.
That hit song was released in France and England in 1980 and it was Marley’s final track --his ninth album ‘Uprising.’
You’d recall the Beatitudes took place on a mountain. Sermon on the Mount or the Beatitudes as it is biblically known can be found in Matthews’s book chapter five. Jesus took his apostles to a mountain where he lectured them. The message had to be drilled down from top to the bottom. The Good News would later find its way to the Gentles too.
At the Achimota Golf Course in Accra the cassock man fed his audience with a different kind of food. They were perhaps not the saints or congregants he usually sees or meet on the pews on Sundays. So he decides to take a different route but still ensuring that he wins the hearts and minds of the gathering.
When Rev. Buckle buckled down that element of feeling pervaded. The white-bearded priest in white polo shirt, white cup and I think an Adidas grey sport pant to match he took his audience to another world. His right hand clutched a microphone, while the left punched the heavens repeatedly, amid shouts of joy, and applause that punctuated the performance.
He’d managed to hold his audience captive. Of course, they’d had gone to the golf course to watch the golfers play. But they were introduced to another course that would sweep them off their feet.
Is Reggae music meant for only Rastafarians?
In his December16, 2010 article titled: ‘Rastafari Theology, Reggae, Music and the Postcolonial Legacy of Bob Marley’ author Juan Boyd Thomas wrote: “Reggae music is no longer heard as a mystical musical outcry against oppression. Instead it is often the commercialized soundtrack for marketing campaign depicting Jamaica as a postcolonial playground.”
He said: “likewise the Rastafarian tradition is no longer a radical African centered counterculture but an important symbolic trope utilized by Jamaican elites in order to maximize the nation’s marketability as tropical vacation hotspot.’
The Associate professor of Black Church Studies of Vanderbilt University Divinity School prefaced his write-up with Marley’s legendary song ‘Get up, Standup—stand up for your right, ’ noting that in these lyrics Bob offers a resounding of traditional modes of Western Christianity which had served as a means of domination and oppression in Jamaica. Indeed Bob Marley’s ‘Get up. Stand up’ song does not only serve as a call to action but it offers a more confrontational and militant tone.
Did you know that saddles are only found in chest in dungeons likewise horse amour?
Certainly, it would have seemed ridiculous to you, if I’d told you that the Archbishop could go circular or perform a reggae song or a repertoire by Bob Marley. The reason, priests are accustomed to hymns, carols, gospels and not circular music. But now you know. Now you’ve seen it happen.
Music is a universal language
That’s a claim by musicians. I however, think there’s fact in that claim. I’ve come to realise that it’s a language that everybody understands no matter what tongue, they speak music. Someone wrote this: “While we may not understand the lyrics of foreign songs we share the same emotions when we hear similar chords and melodies.”
No doubt I believe with music one can communicate across cultural and linguistic barriers I felt that a few days ago when I watched a Zulu song done by an unknown group on the social media.
For example, one cannot resist Indlamu dance by the Zulus of South Africa. It’s so infectious but not only that it exudes the power to capture its audience whether they’re used to it or not. What more? The dancers are often seen clad in leopard skin. The traditional head pieces, the ceremonial belts, the shields and the spears that accompany the dance are just breathtaking.
Psychologists believe there’s some evidence that music can release what they call ‘neurotransmitters’ including dopamine. No wonder we tap out feet, snap our fingers, we whisper and hum along when a good music is played. Some we may not even understand their meaning. Perhaps that explains why they say music is a universal language.

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Reggae Can Still Sell

Reggae artiste ORiel is gearing up to release his debut album this year, and he hopes his single 'People Say' will build a momentum leading up to the project.

The album will be produced by Lloyd Willacy and Ludwig Grant under the Afar Music Group label.

ORiel is hopeful that the project will break barriers for reggae music, especially since the genre has been experiencing poor sales in recent times.

"Reggae music is selling and can still sell. It might not be the big numbers like the other genres, but even those genres have seen a drastic dip in record sales. That is why I think the sound in reggae music has to grow in order to reach a broader audience. My sound is reggae fusion. So, when you listen to my music, no matter where you are from, you will hear something that you can identify with," he told THE STAR.

The artiste, who released an EP titled Confidence before deciding to produce a full length album, also noted that creating EPs gives developing acts the ability to maximise the reach of their work without saturating the market.

An accomplishment

"An EP project was our way of easing into the business of making and promoting music, it's kind of a less is more approach. However, this is my debut album. So, the completion of this record is an accomplishment in itself. But, with that said, the ultimate goal is to deliver a more diverse sound to a more diverse audience," he said.

The album will only be available digitally, however, the artiste did not rule out the possibility of a vinyl release.

"In promoting this album, we intend to release a few singles leading up to the actual release date. People Say is doing well, and we are currently putting together the team for the video," he said.

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Morgan Heritage Wants Everyone to Feel Good

A year ago at this time, Morgan Heritage was 20 days away from winning its first Grammy Award for best reggae album with its 10th studio album, Strictly Roots. Now the critically acclaimed group is ramping up a world tour and finishing up its forthcoming new album -- a taste of which premieres exclusively today on Billboard.com.

“Reggae Night” featuring DreZion finds Morgan Heritage directing that “everyone take a load off” as the group shifts into fourth-gear jam mode. Providing the inspiration for the upbeat anthem -- co-produced by DreZion, also a keyboardist for the band -- was none other than reggae icon and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Jimmy Cliff.

After receiving the track from DreZion and playing it on the tour bus last year, Morgan Heritage vocalist Peetah Morgan recalls, “All we could hear was Jimmy Cliff's song ‘Reggae Night.’ And like many around the world, we are big Jimmy Cliff fans. The song basically wrote itself once we were singing the hook and just vibing.” Vocals for the track were recorded last October in a studio the group set up in its hotel room while in Zimbabwe.

Available now, “Reggae Night” is the second single from Morgan Heritage’s yet-untitled 11th studio album. It’s due this spring via the group’s own Cool To Be Conscious (CTBC) label. The project’s first single “Selah” was released last summer.

Adds Morgan, “We wanted to start the year off with a song to get people feeling good despite all that's going on in the world today.” 

Morgan and his four siblings—Una Morgan (keyboard/vocals), Roy “Gramps” Morgan (keyboard/vocals), Nakhamyah “Lukes” Morgan (rhythm guitar) and Memmalatel “Mr. Mojo” Morgan (percussion/vocals)—will personally deliver that message when the quintet kicks off its world tour on Feb. 18 in Auckland, New Zealand. Additional tour dates will be announced in the weeks to come:

February 18 - Auckland, New Zealand - Raggamuffin Festival - The Trusts Arena 

February 19 - Melbourne, Australia - Raggamuffin Allstar’s Tour - Margaret Court

February 21 - Sydney, Australia - Raggamuffin Allstar’s Tour - Hordern Pavilion

April 13 - Kampala, Uganda - Lugogo Cricket Oval

April 27 - Le Ferme, Martinique - Ferme Perrine

April 28 - Le Gosier, Guadaloupe - Palais Des Sports Du Gosier

April 29 - St Maarten - Carnival Village

May 3 - Antwerp, Belgium - De Roma

May 4 - Oxford, England - O2 Academy

May 5 - Manchester, England - The Ritz

May 6 - Birmingham, England - O2 Academy

May 7 - London England - O2 Forum Kentish Town

May 9 - Paris, France - La Cigale

May 10 - Amsterdam, Holland – Paradiso

May 20 - Nassau, Bahamas – Thomas Robinson Stadium Carnival Grounds

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Reggae Legends for Feb 4

Rastafari mansion, Twelve Tribes of Israel will pay tribute to reggae icons Bob Marley and Dennis Brown at and event dubbed Reggae Legends on February 4.

Staged as part of the the celebrations for Reggae Month, the event will be held at the Twelve Tribes headquarters on Old Hope Road in St Andrew.

The showcase will seek to honour the music of two of Jamaica's greatest in the month of their birth, which Twelve Tribes celebrates as the month of Joseph — the 11th of Jacob's sons, and is also the birth month of the two internationally renowned artistes.

Dennis Emmanuel brown, dubbed the Crown Prince of Reggae was born on February 1, 1957 and died following a brief illness on July 1, 1999 at the age of 42. Marley, the King of Reggae, was born in St Ann on February 6, 1945 and died of cancer on May 11, 1981 at age 36. The extensive musical catalogue of both these men forms a critical part of the reggae anthology.

According to the organisers, a special feature of the night will be the participation of songstress, Mala Brown, daughter of Dennis, as well as Jamaican football Legend Allan “Skill" Cole — a close friend and associate of both Brown and Marley, who will be sharing his favourite playlists from the catalogues of the two artistes. Guest selector for Reggae Legends will be Sun City Radio's DJ Yumi from Japan.

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Dogs Love Reggae And Soft Rock Because It Helps Them Chill Out, Claims Study

Dogs love the sound of reggae music as it has a calming effect on them, a new study of canine behaviour has found.

The research discovered that dogs ' stress levels decreased significantly after the music was played into their kennels.

The Scottish SPCA, Scotland's animal welfare charity, carried out a music experiment at their rehoming centre in Dumbarton in partnership with the University of Glasgow.

It suggested dogs have different music tastes but reggae music, popularised by Bob Marley, and soft rock music by bands like Fleetwood Mac and Foreigner were firm favourites.

As a result of the study, the charity are to buy sound systems to pipe music into the kennels of their rehoming centres across the country.

Neil Evans Professor of Integrative Physiology at the University of Glasgow's Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, said: "Overall, the response to different genres was mixed highlighting the possibility that like humans, our canine friends have their own individual music preferences.

Dog named Bowie with odd colour eyes gets new home thanks to David Bowie's kindhearted son

"That being said, reggae music and soft rock showed the highest positive changes in behaviour."

Glasgow university PhD student Amy Bowman, who helped carry out the study, added: "The research, which took place at the Scottish SPCA centre in Dumbarton, clearly shows that music has an effect on a dog's behaviour.

"We were keen to explore the effect playing different genres of music had, and it was clear that the physiological and behavioural changes observed were maintained during the trial when the dogs were exposed to a variety of music."

The Scottish SPCA previously released research in 2015 that showed the impact classical music had on a dog's behaviour.

The study involved two groups of dogs being examined over a period of two weeks in a rescue and rehoming centre.

One group of dogs was observed in silence, whilst the other had classical music played into their kennels. The conditions were then switched in the second week.

In both groups the dogs' stress levels, measured through heart rates, saliva samples and observation of behaviour, decreased significantly after listening to music.

The dogs also spent less time standing and barking when the music was being played.

Gilly Mendes Ferreira, Scottish SPCA Head of Research and Policy, said "At present both our Glasgow and Edinburgh centres are able to pipe music into their kennels, and in the future every centre will be able to offer our four footed friends a canine approved playlist, with the view to extending this research to other species in our care."

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Jamaica Native Yaadcore Spins Spiritual Reggae Sounds

The rich DJ culture of Jamaica carries the essence and message of reggae music in the perfect selection of records. A talent and a skill, DJing involves commitment, passion, knowledge, and a spiritual connection to the music and the crowd. Reggae music is Jamaica’s national treasure and popular native DJ Yaadcore has emerged a brilliant devotee.

Yaadcore grew up in Mandeville, Manchester. His father was a DJ and owned a sound system, although he discouraged his son from the music industry because of his own struggles. Inspired nonetheless by the strong reggae aura of the island’s culture, today Yaadcore is DJ for renowned reggae artist Protoje, co-founder of the epic Jamaican club event Dubwise, and a strong advocate for the roots resurgence in reggae music.

If you need a new reggae fix, visit Yaadcore’s Soundcloud and “catch a fire.”

Leafly: When did you start spinning records and how did you become interested?

Yaadcore: I started to DJ in 2003 after learning how to beat match from a DJ that worked on my father’s sound system.

What kind of music did you play first and how did it influence your emerging style?

I was exposed to party music, anything that could get the “dance hall” hyped up. This consisted of dancehall, reggae, hip hop, rap, R&B, you name it. This style of DJing has helped me select songs more in a groove to tell a story. DJing is like being on a musical ride.

Who are your reggae heroes and why?

Bob Marley is one my heroes because he had vision to spread the music and the message of Rastafari without compromise or by any means necessary. This was done so well it has opened the door and set a standard to where the music is capable of reaching.

Mikey Dread is also one of my heroes because of his unique sound and style of rhymes. He was Jamaica’s first radio presenter to have a roots reggae radio show and did most of his own production. It’s kind of how I see myself, or the direction I’m heading.

Protoje, last but not least, is one of my heroes because of the role he has played in bringing back the awareness and relevance of reggae music in Jamaica and worldwide. After he rose to the forefront, the door was wide open for new reggae artist to get a listening here, or for even a DJ like me to be able to play straight roots reggae in a session.

Who are your DJ heroes and why?

Mikey Dread again because he was also a DJ!

Stereo Grav Sound System, their style of selections I love because they play the song, then the riddim version of that song for an artist to sing live on. I like this because it incorporates the DJ’s selection as well as the artist performing. This is an original Jamaican way of selection, but this sound system has managed to live throughout generations and still is alive today.

DJ Wayne (Wizzle) from Irie FM is one of Jamaica’s best DJ’s in my eyes. His mixes are so seamless, with the best selections flowing every time! Hosting his radio show with vibes like no other.

What are your favorite elements of reggae music culture?

My favorite elements of reggae music are the feeling it can give when the right message is blended with the right sounds. It can be a very spiritual and uplifting music. The only music on the mainstream market singing praises to the creator. Musically, the bass line, drum patterns, soothing melodies really resonate with the body’s chakras very well.

What is Dubwise?

Dubwise is a style of mixing that can be done when making an original track or to remix an original track with different effects such as reverb, delay and distortion, etc.

Dubwise is also a roots reggae event done by friends Jason Panton, Protoje, and me that we started in Jamaica. It has now become an international event held in Miami every Wednesday, as well as other places such as Brazil, Trinidad and Tobago, Bermuda, a few places in U.S., such as New York, Atlanta, Washington D.C. and has also toured in Europe and Africa.

What kind of DJ setup do you rock?

I’m rocking a Serato setup, preferably used with turntables, but I don’t mind CD players or controllers.

How do you prefer to enjoy your cannabis?

I prefer spliffs, then a bun chalice, similar to a bong, then there is the steam chalice, which is similar to a vaporizer.

What kind of strains do you like to smoke?

I love anything Purple. And, Sour Diesel, best I had was from Seattle. OG’s are good too!

How do you think legalization can change the world?

Legalization could change and impact the world the same way it has in those places it has been now legalized, only on a higher scale. Less crime, less use of other hard drugs, less people in jail, more sick patients being cured, more jobs for people, and more love in the air.

Reggae music has been popular for over 50 years now. How does the genre continue to be so important and stay popular?

Reggae music can never die because of the positive message that it brings. It gives life and mental stability to people worldwide facing oppression and injustice. It is in lights of the same marijuana plant. The healing of the nation! Just like marijuana has been facing struggles and fights, reggae music has also and still is. I give thanks to this platform to share energy.

Check Yaadcore and Protoje out on the Leaf-a-lize it tour this winter. Watch them perform at the following locations:

January 12: The Music Box in San Diego, CA

January 15: The Independent in San Francisco, CA

January 16: The Mystic Theatre in Petaluma, CA

January 18: Echoplex in Los Angeles, CA

January 25: Domino Room in Bend, OR

February 7: Belly Up Aspen in Aspen, CO. A talent and a skill, DJing involves commitment, passion, knowledge, and a spiritual connection to the music and the crowd. Reggae music is Jamaica’s national treasure and popular native DJ Yaadcore has emerged a brilliant devotee.

Yaadcore grew up in Mandeville, Manchester. His father was a DJ and owned a sound system, although he discouraged his son from the music industry because of his own struggles. Inspired nonetheless by the strong reggae aura of the island’s culture, today Yaadcore is DJ for renowned reggae artist Protoje, co-founder of the epic Jamaican club event Dubwise, and a strong advocate for the roots resurgence in reggae music.

If you need a new reggae fix, visit Yaadcore’s Soundcloud and “catch a fire.”

Leafly: When did you start spinning records and how did you become interested?

Yaadcore: I started to DJ in 2003 after learning how to beat match from a DJ that worked on my father’s sound system.

What kind of music did you play first and how did it influence your emerging style?

I was exposed to party music, anything that could get the “dance hall” hyped up. This consisted of dancehall, reggae, hip hop, rap, R&B, you name it. This style of DJing has helped me select songs more in a groove to tell a story. DJing is like being on a musical ride.

Who are your reggae heroes and why?

Bob Marley is one my heroes because he had vision to spread the music and the message of Rastafari without compromise or by any means necessary. This was done so well it has opened the door and set a standard to where the music is capable of reaching.

Mikey Dread is also one of my heroes because of his unique sound and style of rhymes. He was Jamaica’s first radio presenter to have a roots reggae radio show and did most of his own production. It’s kind of how I see myself, or the direction I’m heading.

Protoje, last but not least, is one of my heroes because of the role he has played in bringing back the awareness and relevance of reggae music in Jamaica and worldwide. After he rose to the forefront, the door was wide open for new reggae artist to get a listening here, or for even a DJ like me to be able to play straight roots reggae in a session.

Who are your DJ heroes and why?

Mikey Dread again because he was also a DJ!

Stereo Grav Sound System, their style of selections I love because they play the song, then the riddim version of that song for an artist to sing live on. I like this because it incorporates the DJ’s selection as well as the artist performing. This is an original Jamaican way of selection, but this sound system has managed to live throughout generations and still is alive today.

DJ Wayne (Wizzle) from Irie FM is one of Jamaica’s best DJ’s in my eyes. His mixes are so seamless, with the best selections flowing every time! Hosting his radio show with vibes like no other.

What are your favorite elements of reggae music culture?

My favorite elements of reggae music are the feeling it can give when the right message is blended with the right sounds. It can be a very spiritual and uplifting music. The only music on the mainstream market singing praises to the creator. Musically, the bass line, drum patterns, soothing melodies really resonate with the body’s chakras very well.

What is Dubwise?

Dubwise is a style of mixing that can be done when making an original track or to remix an original track with different effects such as reverb, delay and distortion, etc.

Dubwise is also a roots reggae event done by friends Jason Panton, Protoje, and me that we started in Jamaica. It has now become an international event held in Miami every Wednesday, as well as other places such as Brazil, Trinidad and Tobago, Bermuda, a few places in U.S., such as New York, Atlanta, Washington D.C. and has also toured in Europe and Africa.

What kind of DJ setup do you rock?

I’m rocking a Serato setup, preferably used with turntables, but I don’t mind CD players or controllers.

How do you prefer to enjoy your cannabis?

I prefer spliffs, then a bun chalice, similar to a bong, then there is the steam chalice, which is similar to a vaporizer.

What kind of strains do you like to smoke?

I love anything Purple. And, Sour Diesel, best I had was from Seattle. OG’s are good too!

How do you think legalization can change the world?

Legalization could change and impact the world the same way it has in those places it has been now legalized, only on a higher scale. Less crime, less use of other hard drugs, less people in jail, more sick patients being cured, more jobs for people, and more love in the air.

Reggae music has been popular for over 50 years now. How does the genre continue to be so important and stay popular?

Reggae music can never die because of the positive message that it brings. It gives life and mental stability to people worldwide facing oppression and injustice. It is in lights of the same marijuana plant. The healing of the nation! Just like marijuana has been facing struggles and fights, reggae music has also and still is. I give thanks to this platform to share energy.

Check Yaadcore and Protoje out on the Leaf-a-lize it tour this winter. Watch them perform at the following locations:

January 12: The Music Box in San Diego, CA

January 15: The Independent in San Francisco, CA

January 16: The Mystic Theatre in Petaluma, CA

January 18: Echoplex in Los Angeles, CA

January 25: Domino Room in Bend, OR

February 7: Belly Up Aspen in Aspen, CO

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Every year millions of Asian, European, American and Other World tourists visit these islands under the sun to experience a little bit of paradise. With a distinct diversity in culture, norms and way of life, it is almost always guaranteed to have a new and different experience every time you vacation.  This Reggae Radio known as Reggae141 promotes, inspires, guides and fortifies by way of musical entertainment.

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