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Reggae Can Still Sell

Reggae artiste ORiel is gearing up to release his debut album this year, and he hopes his single 'People Say' will build a momentum leading up to the project.

The album will be produced by Lloyd Willacy and Ludwig Grant under the Afar Music Group label.

ORiel is hopeful that the project will break barriers for reggae music, especially since the genre has been experiencing poor sales in recent times.

"Reggae music is selling and can still sell. It might not be the big numbers like the other genres, but even those genres have seen a drastic dip in record sales. That is why I think the sound in reggae music has to grow in order to reach a broader audience. My sound is reggae fusion. So, when you listen to my music, no matter where you are from, you will hear something that you can identify with," he told THE STAR.

The artiste, who released an EP titled Confidence before deciding to produce a full length album, also noted that creating EPs gives developing acts the ability to maximise the reach of their work without saturating the market.

An accomplishment

"An EP project was our way of easing into the business of making and promoting music, it's kind of a less is more approach. However, this is my debut album. So, the completion of this record is an accomplishment in itself. But, with that said, the ultimate goal is to deliver a more diverse sound to a more diverse audience," he said.

The album will only be available digitally, however, the artiste did not rule out the possibility of a vinyl release.

"In promoting this album, we intend to release a few singles leading up to the actual release date. People Say is doing well, and we are currently putting together the team for the video," he said.

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Morgan Heritage Wants Everyone to Feel Good

A year ago at this time, Morgan Heritage was 20 days away from winning its first Grammy Award for best reggae album with its 10th studio album, Strictly Roots. Now the critically acclaimed group is ramping up a world tour and finishing up its forthcoming new album -- a taste of which premieres exclusively today on Billboard.com.

“Reggae Night” featuring DreZion finds Morgan Heritage directing that “everyone take a load off” as the group shifts into fourth-gear jam mode. Providing the inspiration for the upbeat anthem -- co-produced by DreZion, also a keyboardist for the band -- was none other than reggae icon and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Jimmy Cliff.

After receiving the track from DreZion and playing it on the tour bus last year, Morgan Heritage vocalist Peetah Morgan recalls, “All we could hear was Jimmy Cliff's song ‘Reggae Night.’ And like many around the world, we are big Jimmy Cliff fans. The song basically wrote itself once we were singing the hook and just vibing.” Vocals for the track were recorded last October in a studio the group set up in its hotel room while in Zimbabwe.

Available now, “Reggae Night” is the second single from Morgan Heritage’s yet-untitled 11th studio album. It’s due this spring via the group’s own Cool To Be Conscious (CTBC) label. The project’s first single “Selah” was released last summer.

Adds Morgan, “We wanted to start the year off with a song to get people feeling good despite all that's going on in the world today.” 

Morgan and his four siblings—Una Morgan (keyboard/vocals), Roy “Gramps” Morgan (keyboard/vocals), Nakhamyah “Lukes” Morgan (rhythm guitar) and Memmalatel “Mr. Mojo” Morgan (percussion/vocals)—will personally deliver that message when the quintet kicks off its world tour on Feb. 18 in Auckland, New Zealand. Additional tour dates will be announced in the weeks to come:

February 18 - Auckland, New Zealand - Raggamuffin Festival - The Trusts Arena 

February 19 - Melbourne, Australia - Raggamuffin Allstar’s Tour - Margaret Court

February 21 - Sydney, Australia - Raggamuffin Allstar’s Tour - Hordern Pavilion

April 13 - Kampala, Uganda - Lugogo Cricket Oval

April 27 - Le Ferme, Martinique - Ferme Perrine

April 28 - Le Gosier, Guadaloupe - Palais Des Sports Du Gosier

April 29 - St Maarten - Carnival Village

May 3 - Antwerp, Belgium - De Roma

May 4 - Oxford, England - O2 Academy

May 5 - Manchester, England - The Ritz

May 6 - Birmingham, England - O2 Academy

May 7 - London England - O2 Forum Kentish Town

May 9 - Paris, France - La Cigale

May 10 - Amsterdam, Holland – Paradiso

May 20 - Nassau, Bahamas – Thomas Robinson Stadium Carnival Grounds

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Reggae Legends for Feb 4

Rastafari mansion, Twelve Tribes of Israel will pay tribute to reggae icons Bob Marley and Dennis Brown at and event dubbed Reggae Legends on February 4.

Staged as part of the the celebrations for Reggae Month, the event will be held at the Twelve Tribes headquarters on Old Hope Road in St Andrew.

The showcase will seek to honour the music of two of Jamaica's greatest in the month of their birth, which Twelve Tribes celebrates as the month of Joseph — the 11th of Jacob's sons, and is also the birth month of the two internationally renowned artistes.

Dennis Emmanuel brown, dubbed the Crown Prince of Reggae was born on February 1, 1957 and died following a brief illness on July 1, 1999 at the age of 42. Marley, the King of Reggae, was born in St Ann on February 6, 1945 and died of cancer on May 11, 1981 at age 36. The extensive musical catalogue of both these men forms a critical part of the reggae anthology.

According to the organisers, a special feature of the night will be the participation of songstress, Mala Brown, daughter of Dennis, as well as Jamaican football Legend Allan “Skill" Cole — a close friend and associate of both Brown and Marley, who will be sharing his favourite playlists from the catalogues of the two artistes. Guest selector for Reggae Legends will be Sun City Radio's DJ Yumi from Japan.

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Dogs Love Reggae And Soft Rock Because It Helps Them Chill Out, Claims Study

Dogs love the sound of reggae music as it has a calming effect on them, a new study of canine behaviour has found.

The research discovered that dogs ' stress levels decreased significantly after the music was played into their kennels.

The Scottish SPCA, Scotland's animal welfare charity, carried out a music experiment at their rehoming centre in Dumbarton in partnership with the University of Glasgow.

It suggested dogs have different music tastes but reggae music, popularised by Bob Marley, and soft rock music by bands like Fleetwood Mac and Foreigner were firm favourites.

As a result of the study, the charity are to buy sound systems to pipe music into the kennels of their rehoming centres across the country.

Neil Evans Professor of Integrative Physiology at the University of Glasgow's Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, said: "Overall, the response to different genres was mixed highlighting the possibility that like humans, our canine friends have their own individual music preferences.

Dog named Bowie with odd colour eyes gets new home thanks to David Bowie's kindhearted son

"That being said, reggae music and soft rock showed the highest positive changes in behaviour."

Glasgow university PhD student Amy Bowman, who helped carry out the study, added: "The research, which took place at the Scottish SPCA centre in Dumbarton, clearly shows that music has an effect on a dog's behaviour.

"We were keen to explore the effect playing different genres of music had, and it was clear that the physiological and behavioural changes observed were maintained during the trial when the dogs were exposed to a variety of music."

The Scottish SPCA previously released research in 2015 that showed the impact classical music had on a dog's behaviour.

The study involved two groups of dogs being examined over a period of two weeks in a rescue and rehoming centre.

One group of dogs was observed in silence, whilst the other had classical music played into their kennels. The conditions were then switched in the second week.

In both groups the dogs' stress levels, measured through heart rates, saliva samples and observation of behaviour, decreased significantly after listening to music.

The dogs also spent less time standing and barking when the music was being played.

Gilly Mendes Ferreira, Scottish SPCA Head of Research and Policy, said "At present both our Glasgow and Edinburgh centres are able to pipe music into their kennels, and in the future every centre will be able to offer our four footed friends a canine approved playlist, with the view to extending this research to other species in our care."

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Jamaica Native Yaadcore Spins Spiritual Reggae Sounds

The rich DJ culture of Jamaica carries the essence and message of reggae music in the perfect selection of records. A talent and a skill, DJing involves commitment, passion, knowledge, and a spiritual connection to the music and the crowd. Reggae music is Jamaica’s national treasure and popular native DJ Yaadcore has emerged a brilliant devotee.

Yaadcore grew up in Mandeville, Manchester. His father was a DJ and owned a sound system, although he discouraged his son from the music industry because of his own struggles. Inspired nonetheless by the strong reggae aura of the island’s culture, today Yaadcore is DJ for renowned reggae artist Protoje, co-founder of the epic Jamaican club event Dubwise, and a strong advocate for the roots resurgence in reggae music.

If you need a new reggae fix, visit Yaadcore’s Soundcloud and “catch a fire.”

Leafly: When did you start spinning records and how did you become interested?

Yaadcore: I started to DJ in 2003 after learning how to beat match from a DJ that worked on my father’s sound system.

What kind of music did you play first and how did it influence your emerging style?

I was exposed to party music, anything that could get the “dance hall” hyped up. This consisted of dancehall, reggae, hip hop, rap, R&B, you name it. This style of DJing has helped me select songs more in a groove to tell a story. DJing is like being on a musical ride.

Who are your reggae heroes and why?

Bob Marley is one my heroes because he had vision to spread the music and the message of Rastafari without compromise or by any means necessary. This was done so well it has opened the door and set a standard to where the music is capable of reaching.

Mikey Dread is also one of my heroes because of his unique sound and style of rhymes. He was Jamaica’s first radio presenter to have a roots reggae radio show and did most of his own production. It’s kind of how I see myself, or the direction I’m heading.

Protoje, last but not least, is one of my heroes because of the role he has played in bringing back the awareness and relevance of reggae music in Jamaica and worldwide. After he rose to the forefront, the door was wide open for new reggae artist to get a listening here, or for even a DJ like me to be able to play straight roots reggae in a session.

Who are your DJ heroes and why?

Mikey Dread again because he was also a DJ!

Stereo Grav Sound System, their style of selections I love because they play the song, then the riddim version of that song for an artist to sing live on. I like this because it incorporates the DJ’s selection as well as the artist performing. This is an original Jamaican way of selection, but this sound system has managed to live throughout generations and still is alive today.

DJ Wayne (Wizzle) from Irie FM is one of Jamaica’s best DJ’s in my eyes. His mixes are so seamless, with the best selections flowing every time! Hosting his radio show with vibes like no other.

What are your favorite elements of reggae music culture?

My favorite elements of reggae music are the feeling it can give when the right message is blended with the right sounds. It can be a very spiritual and uplifting music. The only music on the mainstream market singing praises to the creator. Musically, the bass line, drum patterns, soothing melodies really resonate with the body’s chakras very well.

What is Dubwise?

Dubwise is a style of mixing that can be done when making an original track or to remix an original track with different effects such as reverb, delay and distortion, etc.

Dubwise is also a roots reggae event done by friends Jason Panton, Protoje, and me that we started in Jamaica. It has now become an international event held in Miami every Wednesday, as well as other places such as Brazil, Trinidad and Tobago, Bermuda, a few places in U.S., such as New York, Atlanta, Washington D.C. and has also toured in Europe and Africa.

What kind of DJ setup do you rock?

I’m rocking a Serato setup, preferably used with turntables, but I don’t mind CD players or controllers.

How do you prefer to enjoy your cannabis?

I prefer spliffs, then a bun chalice, similar to a bong, then there is the steam chalice, which is similar to a vaporizer.

What kind of strains do you like to smoke?

I love anything Purple. And, Sour Diesel, best I had was from Seattle. OG’s are good too!

How do you think legalization can change the world?

Legalization could change and impact the world the same way it has in those places it has been now legalized, only on a higher scale. Less crime, less use of other hard drugs, less people in jail, more sick patients being cured, more jobs for people, and more love in the air.

Reggae music has been popular for over 50 years now. How does the genre continue to be so important and stay popular?

Reggae music can never die because of the positive message that it brings. It gives life and mental stability to people worldwide facing oppression and injustice. It is in lights of the same marijuana plant. The healing of the nation! Just like marijuana has been facing struggles and fights, reggae music has also and still is. I give thanks to this platform to share energy.

Check Yaadcore and Protoje out on the Leaf-a-lize it tour this winter. Watch them perform at the following locations:

January 12: The Music Box in San Diego, CA

January 15: The Independent in San Francisco, CA

January 16: The Mystic Theatre in Petaluma, CA

January 18: Echoplex in Los Angeles, CA

January 25: Domino Room in Bend, OR

February 7: Belly Up Aspen in Aspen, CO. A talent and a skill, DJing involves commitment, passion, knowledge, and a spiritual connection to the music and the crowd. Reggae music is Jamaica’s national treasure and popular native DJ Yaadcore has emerged a brilliant devotee.

Yaadcore grew up in Mandeville, Manchester. His father was a DJ and owned a sound system, although he discouraged his son from the music industry because of his own struggles. Inspired nonetheless by the strong reggae aura of the island’s culture, today Yaadcore is DJ for renowned reggae artist Protoje, co-founder of the epic Jamaican club event Dubwise, and a strong advocate for the roots resurgence in reggae music.

If you need a new reggae fix, visit Yaadcore’s Soundcloud and “catch a fire.”

Leafly: When did you start spinning records and how did you become interested?

Yaadcore: I started to DJ in 2003 after learning how to beat match from a DJ that worked on my father’s sound system.

What kind of music did you play first and how did it influence your emerging style?

I was exposed to party music, anything that could get the “dance hall” hyped up. This consisted of dancehall, reggae, hip hop, rap, R&B, you name it. This style of DJing has helped me select songs more in a groove to tell a story. DJing is like being on a musical ride.

Who are your reggae heroes and why?

Bob Marley is one my heroes because he had vision to spread the music and the message of Rastafari without compromise or by any means necessary. This was done so well it has opened the door and set a standard to where the music is capable of reaching.

Mikey Dread is also one of my heroes because of his unique sound and style of rhymes. He was Jamaica’s first radio presenter to have a roots reggae radio show and did most of his own production. It’s kind of how I see myself, or the direction I’m heading.

Protoje, last but not least, is one of my heroes because of the role he has played in bringing back the awareness and relevance of reggae music in Jamaica and worldwide. After he rose to the forefront, the door was wide open for new reggae artist to get a listening here, or for even a DJ like me to be able to play straight roots reggae in a session.

Who are your DJ heroes and why?

Mikey Dread again because he was also a DJ!

Stereo Grav Sound System, their style of selections I love because they play the song, then the riddim version of that song for an artist to sing live on. I like this because it incorporates the DJ’s selection as well as the artist performing. This is an original Jamaican way of selection, but this sound system has managed to live throughout generations and still is alive today.

DJ Wayne (Wizzle) from Irie FM is one of Jamaica’s best DJ’s in my eyes. His mixes are so seamless, with the best selections flowing every time! Hosting his radio show with vibes like no other.

What are your favorite elements of reggae music culture?

My favorite elements of reggae music are the feeling it can give when the right message is blended with the right sounds. It can be a very spiritual and uplifting music. The only music on the mainstream market singing praises to the creator. Musically, the bass line, drum patterns, soothing melodies really resonate with the body’s chakras very well.

What is Dubwise?

Dubwise is a style of mixing that can be done when making an original track or to remix an original track with different effects such as reverb, delay and distortion, etc.

Dubwise is also a roots reggae event done by friends Jason Panton, Protoje, and me that we started in Jamaica. It has now become an international event held in Miami every Wednesday, as well as other places such as Brazil, Trinidad and Tobago, Bermuda, a few places in U.S., such as New York, Atlanta, Washington D.C. and has also toured in Europe and Africa.

What kind of DJ setup do you rock?

I’m rocking a Serato setup, preferably used with turntables, but I don’t mind CD players or controllers.

How do you prefer to enjoy your cannabis?

I prefer spliffs, then a bun chalice, similar to a bong, then there is the steam chalice, which is similar to a vaporizer.

What kind of strains do you like to smoke?

I love anything Purple. And, Sour Diesel, best I had was from Seattle. OG’s are good too!

How do you think legalization can change the world?

Legalization could change and impact the world the same way it has in those places it has been now legalized, only on a higher scale. Less crime, less use of other hard drugs, less people in jail, more sick patients being cured, more jobs for people, and more love in the air.

Reggae music has been popular for over 50 years now. How does the genre continue to be so important and stay popular?

Reggae music can never die because of the positive message that it brings. It gives life and mental stability to people worldwide facing oppression and injustice. It is in lights of the same marijuana plant. The healing of the nation! Just like marijuana has been facing struggles and fights, reggae music has also and still is. I give thanks to this platform to share energy.

Check Yaadcore and Protoje out on the Leaf-a-lize it tour this winter. Watch them perform at the following locations:

January 12: The Music Box in San Diego, CA

January 15: The Independent in San Francisco, CA

January 16: The Mystic Theatre in Petaluma, CA

January 18: Echoplex in Los Angeles, CA

January 25: Domino Room in Bend, OR

February 7: Belly Up Aspen in Aspen, CO

Read more...

Reggae Band On A Charity Mission

The reggae group Idren, now performing at Tobacco Bay, take their name from the Rasta word for brethren, and they take the cause seriously.

The band, in conjunction with the Bermuda Tourism Authority and beach management, are donating $100 to Big Brothers Big Sister of Bermuda, each time they deliver their Saturday performances at the popular East End beach.

“Our name means the essence of brotherhood, and whenever we can we will work something out for charity,” explained band member Keven “Keyz” Williams.

“The Sunshine League used to be our favourite until they closed. With Big Brothers Big Sisters, we have seen the good works and the results.”

Added singer and frontman KulJah: “The youth need guidance and protection, and music is a thing that brings people together. Sometimes when you help good things to happen, it comes back to you.”

Belcario Thomas of the Tobacco Bay management firm Beach Boys applauded the move.

“We just want to convey our appreciation for the opportunity to help transform the next generation of Bermudians through this display of art,” Mr Thomas said. “It’s with the support of the BTA we have been able to do that.”

The gesture warmed the heart of Patrina O’Connor, managing director of the charity.

“I was honoured when they contacted us. It’s a difficult economic climate for charities, and every little bit helps. We want to encourage everyone to come out and support the band for what they’re doing as well as the music.”

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Female Reggae Artist Coming To Brighton

A 7 piece Reggae Band is coming to Brighton with the aim of spreading kindness across the city.

Beth Prior are launching their brand new album "Little Acts of Kindness" with donations going for her second single being donated to a homeless charity and refugees in Lesbos.

They will be appearing at the Green Door Store on Tuesday evening with doors opening at 5pm.

Listen to Beth Prior - Green Tea below.

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Lee Scratch Perry At 80

Little prepares you for a chat with Lee "Scratch" Perry. Now 80, the eccentric godfather of dub - an agitator and aggregate of Jamaican roots reggae and all that that implies (productions for the Clash, Bob Marley, and more) - doesn't talk in circles. The Upsetter, performing Tuesday at World Cafe Live, speaks in waves and cloud formations, religious- and comic-theme riddles with an oddly rhythmic cadence and a thick Jamaican patois.

Perry also huffs and laughs mischievously at the end of every phrase, as though he's in on some cosmic joke that fill the songs from his new album, Must Be Free (released on Pottstown's MVD Entertainment label), and interludes from Visions of Paradise, the just-released documentary of his strange and storied life.

"You know Lee," his tour manager, band member, and onetime Philadelphia musician John Emch says from a gig in Austin, Texas. "He's incredible and progressive; always wants the newest stuff to go with the traditions." Emch points out that Perry's new band features computer sequencers and aged percussionists from his Black Ark Studio, a Kingston sound haven that Perry legendarily burned to the ground in 1978 - with his tape reels and paraphernalia inside - because of the bad spirits he felt through its walls. That event is captured on "Black Ark Vampires," Perry's new single and video.

For his part, Perry is full of heavenly and earthly bliss and good cheer, especially after a particularly good gig. "It was fantastic," he says. "The people looked for good vibes, good feelings, and they heard it all. They wanted a cure and I cured them. They wanted righteousness and I made them whole. It was my nation. Righteousness must reign and righteousness must rule. God is perfect, God is pure, God is sure, God must reign and God must rule - and He did."

Perry is certain God and music - "one and the same" - are why he continues performing at his advanced age and what got the man known as the Upsetter started in the first place. Finding his way to instrumentation, to sound boards, to creating dub, period, was all but a ruse for Perry to get close to God, in his estimation. "God has used me as an instrument. God went to my mother and made it rain and sent her the Holy Spirit for me to know dub - the Holy Dove, have you ever heard a bird coo?" Perry asks before he demonstrates. "Akoo. Akoo. Akoo. Make Holy Dub. Akoo."

Of the new album, Perry mentions the inspiration of ganja, fish ("I am a Pisces"), and cornbread ("the unicorn and life itself comes from the corn and the bread"), especially on new songs such as "House of Sin" and "Black Ark Vampires."

Perry is explicit in his belief that God let him know that the evil spirit was running rampant in his studio and that the producer had a holy duty to rid himself of the bad vibes. "It burned. Now I am free again. I have never regretted that moment. I would not have ever been free."

Perry has since lived in Switzerland, necessary to rid himself of "distortion" to his brain and the "deconstruction" all around him. "No wicked spirits. I have to stay away from vampires."

He's made working with computers an almost spiritual enterprise. "The computer is like my brother. I put my brain in the computer. A to Zed - I believe in that. I blow ganja into the computer. Why not?"

Perry tried to stay away from the ganja that has been a staple of his life since growing up in Negril at the foot of the King Stone. At 70, Perry put down the weed for a time, relying on a band filled with musicians who "smoke no cigarette or cigar, eat no flesh or do anything bad like handle dead meat, fish, or liver."

Ask him if he still bans marijuana from his daily regimen and he laughs. "That did not last long, no. The spirit was missing. The message was missing. I do without nicotine and cigars. Ganja I smoke. It's holy magic."

Read more...

Exco Levi Make It On Brampton’s Walk of Fame

As the undisputed monarch of the reggae scene in Canada with four Juno Awards under his belt, Brampton’s Exco Levi has not let fame get in the way of creating salt-of-the-earth type music that resonates with his fans around the world.

On Saturday, Levi (born Wayneford Omaro Levy), will likely wear a mile-long smile as he’s inducted into Brampton’s Walk of Fame with four other heavyweights from Canada’s arts and entertainment world.

 “It’s great to know I have been recognized for good music whose message is uplifting,” Levi told The Guardian.  “We live in a world where negativity and mayhem are in the front pages. It’s good to know, I, Exco Levi, am being feted for creating music that has positive energy.”

Levi, who splits his time between Brampton and Jamaica, has been churning out a steady stream of hits in the last decade or so. His music serves as a homage to the struggles, perseverance and spirit of humans, whether it’s Sweet Jamaica, Bleaching Shop or Life in the Factory.

The Bramptonian immigrated to Canada from Manchester, Jamaica in 2005 with a pocketful of dreams, not much in the way of money and dozens of unsung melodies in his heart.

“When you sing the truth from your heart, it’s hard not to experience true happiness,” said Levi whose fan base stretches to not just Canada and Jamaica but Europe, Africa and across the west coast in the U.S. “One of my biggest songs in Canada is about living my life in a factory. I came up with the song when I worked in a factory in Toronto. People related to it because it’s truthful.”

“Exco” an alias was inspired from his soccer idol Andrés Escobar’s name. “Levi,” which means “high priest,” was what the elder rastas (Rastafari) of his tribe christened him with when he joined the flock.

In 2007, few years after his arrival in Canada, Levi released a single, O’ Canada. The song was an instant hit and then it all fell into place.

Along with his ability to write and compose, Levi’s also exceptionally adept at recording and engineering sounds. A feat he learned at Stineam and Triple Platinum Studios in Jamaica.

“Everybody has different talents and different calling and the trick is to know what your purpose on earth is,” he said. “From a young age, I realized this (music) was my mission on earth. Recording your music is important. Today, I have my own studio in the basement of my Brampton home and I do a lot of my vocal recording there.”

Understanding all aspects of the business: writing, composing, playing an instrument and recording, all ultimately help the artist, Levi said.

One of Levi’s cornerstones of success is his ability to collaborate with other artists, DJs.

Read more...

Bearfoots Releases Earthy Debut EP, Tribe

Bearfoot have hit the ground running and formed a congregation of sounds, vibrations, and textures on their debut EP, Tribe.

The EP is a collection of tracks that have been festival-proven time and time again, and stand as a dedication to those that had supported, nurtured, mentored and inspired them – the Vibe Tribe – that is, those who stand for a creative culture, with their fists in the air, white knuckled, loud voices, and dancing feet.

The six tracks live up to the impression, and expectation we were given from their early preview release of Dreamer, the much-anticipated follow-up to the single, Impolite, which saw Barefoot reunite with producer Paulie B to pump out one stomper of a track.

Could Be Worse is the first track we hear when listening to Tribe. It kicks of the EP with a positive message that focuses on the brighter side of life.

One Drop draws us right into the reggae realm, not only does the track stand out as extremely catchy, but the boys make sure we know what it is we’re listening to “this is a Reggae song” and deliver a message of peace that rings all too true “Reggae never hurt anyone.”

Impolite delivers an active rhythm section, and hooks, securing its place as the standout track on the EP, whilst the final track Babylon has a less-reggae, more relaxed aura, making it the perfect track to end with and chill out to.

Prior to my listening of Tribe, I wouldn’t have considered myself to a fan of the genre. So, to say with honesty that this record has left me highly impressed and longing to hear more from the band says a lot about this EP.

Tribe truly is a mood lightning, conscious settling first effort that is dug deep in the earths roots. It will no doubt be enjoyed by Reggae fans, and music lovers alike.

To celebrate the release of their EP, Bearfoot will also be taking their tracks on the road in Queensland and northern New South Wales to clubs and festivals throughout July to October.

See below for some tracks from Bearfoots.

Read more...

Sizzla To Perform In The USA After 8 Hiatus

It’s been eight years since Jamaican reggae singer Sizzla Kalonji lost his US visa amidst claims that he sang anti-gay songs. But Sizzla, born Miguel Orlando Collins, in Kingston, Jamaica, has had his US visa reinstated and will return to the U.S. for long overdue performances beginning next month.

Sizzla will perform at Reggae on the River in California from August 4-7th, his first US performance in eight years. He will also perform in New York for the Irie Jam radio’s 23rd anniversary event at Roy Wilkins Park in Queens, NY on September 4.

Sizzla is one of the most commercially and critically successful contemporary reggae artists and is noted for his high number of releases. As of 2014 he had released over 70 solo albums.

He has undergone criticism due to anti-gay lyrics in some of his recordings, causing the cancellation of many international concerts including in the US Canada, Sweden, Germany and the UK.

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